Articles

Age Difference

Her fingers flit expressively back and forth like sparrows when she communicates in sign language: “Hello, my name is Sarah!” Sarah Deane, WC ’12, is not deaf, but she hopes, some day soon, to work as a teacher for the hearing-impaired. “I just think signing is so beautiful,” she says, shyly inspecting her fingernails, which […]

Steve McKibbon: Developing Education

As a second-generation Brenau trustee, born and raised in Gainesville, Ga., Steve P. McKibbon says he always knew about the college in his community. His first vivid memory of the educational possibilities available, however, dates to his 14th year when his father, Jack, was still on the board: Steve took scuba diving lessons in the […]

New Mommy on Wheels

I always wanted to have children. And, although I knew there would be unknowns and unique challenges because of my spinal cord injury, I also knew that I was destined to be a mommy. Doctors told me it was possible and that was all I needed to hear. Today, it’s almost unreal that it’s a dream […]

‘Communicator’ Dobkins Steers Women’s College

New Women's College Dean, Debra Dobkins

At the alumni reunion last April, Brenau President Ed Schrader, speaking from the terrace outside Hopkins Dining Hall, introduced to the assemblage of mostly Women’s College graduates a person whom he described as “someone you are all going to want to meet.” Actually, many – particularly those who had graduated in the past decade and […]

‘A year…if you’re lucky’

Brenau nursing students learn communications skills in many ways, including role playing and discussions of how they would handle tragic real-life situations with patients and their loved ones. Sometimes, however, a ‘scenario’ hits close to home.  In her new role as a public speaker, Kelly Flanagan McCormick, WC ’04, starts her story with a smile […]

Talking with the other side of the world

Talking with another side of the World by Candice Dyer. At Brenau, language and how we use it, is the heart of human communication.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Lee Walburn, the venerable former editor of Atlanta Magazine, once described the distinctive northeast Georgia mountain twang of his star writer Candice Dyer, WC ’92, as sounding like the verbal utterances of the love child of country singer Loretta Lynn and NASCAR icon Bill Elliott. With that sort of credential, there was really […]

Brenau’s ‘Best and Brightest’

Honorable Mention by Rudi Kiefer

In front of the Academy building on the Gainesville campus a Women’s College student group huddles in clusters of three, each collectively molding handfuls of sand and water into shapes. Some insert little sticks of wood and pat the goop with their hands to solidify it. Others pour more water into the low spots, cheering […]

Dramatis persona: Grace Hooten Moore, 1917-2012

In a sort of role reversal from Shakespearean England, when Grace Hooten Moore, WC ’38, was a drama and speech student at Brenau College in the 1930s, she had such a deep voice that the only parts she ever landed in theatrical productions at the women’s college were those of men. As one version of […]

A very unShackelton-like ‘Antarctic Explorer’

AS A WRITER, Gloria Cassity Stargel, WC ’77, always looks “for a story that has a little twist to it,” she says, gesturing with her tiny hand like she’s jimmying a lock with an imaginary screwdriver. Those foundling bits others ignore make her stories memorable and, in a word professional journalists need to learn, salable. […]

Brenau’s Pet Rocks

The original Dare Stone, Front and Back

With focus on the 400th anniversary of America’s first permanent English settlement, interest revived in Brenau’s unique trove of hand-carved rocks that could hold key clues to solving one of the Americas’ greatest mysteries – what happened to ‘The Lost Colony’ of Roanoke. For many, however, the Eleanor Dare Stones remain merely a map to one of the better-played historical hoaxes of all time. Even in infamy, the 2,000 pounds of rocks that have been in Brenau’s possession for seven decades hold an even better story of the nation’s curiosity about her past.

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