Articles

Talking with the other side of the world

Talking with another side of the World by Candice Dyer. At Brenau, language and how we use it, is the heart of human communication.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Lee Walburn, the venerable former editor of Atlanta Magazine, once described the distinctive northeast Georgia mountain twang of his star writer Candice Dyer, WC ’92, as sounding like the verbal utterances of the love child of country singer Loretta Lynn and NASCAR icon Bill Elliott. With that sort of credential, there was really […]

Brenau’s ‘Best and Brightest’

Honorable Mention by Rudi Kiefer

In front of the Academy building on the Gainesville campus a Women’s College student group huddles in clusters of three, each collectively molding handfuls of sand and water into shapes. Some insert little sticks of wood and pat the goop with their hands to solidify it. Others pour more water into the low spots, cheering […]

Dramatis persona: Grace Hooten Moore, 1917-2012

In a sort of role reversal from Shakespearean England, when Grace Hooten Moore, WC ’38, was a drama and speech student at Brenau College in the 1930s, she had such a deep voice that the only parts she ever landed in theatrical productions at the women’s college were those of men. As one version of […]

A very unShackelton-like ‘Antarctic Explorer’

AS A WRITER, Gloria Cassity Stargel, WC ’77, always looks “for a story that has a little twist to it,” she says, gesturing with her tiny hand like she’s jimmying a lock with an imaginary screwdriver. Those foundling bits others ignore make her stories memorable and, in a word professional journalists need to learn, salable. […]

Brenau’s Pet Rocks

The original Dare Stone, Front and Back

With focus on the 400th anniversary of America’s first permanent English settlement, interest revived in Brenau’s unique trove of hand-carved rocks that could hold key clues to solving one of the Americas’ greatest mysteries – what happened to ‘The Lost Colony’ of Roanoke. For many, however, the Eleanor Dare Stones remain merely a map to one of the better-played historical hoaxes of all time. Even in infamy, the 2,000 pounds of rocks that have been in Brenau’s possession for seven decades hold an even better story of the nation’s curiosity about her past.

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